The University of the Third Age

U3A Okeover

Programme for Term 3, 2017

A Volcanology

Dates: Thursdays 17, 24, 31 August, 7, 14 September

B Banks Peninsula

Dates: Thursdays 17, 24, 31 August, 7, 14 September

C Irish History

Dates: Thursdays 21, 28 September, 5, 12, 19 October

D Reason and Moral Beliefs

Dates: Thursdays 21, 28 September, 5, 12, 19 October

Times: 10.00 a.m. - 11.30 a.m.

Enrolments for this term closed on Thursday 19 Oct 2017.

Officers:

Chairman:Peter Moody3517448
Secretary:Peter Braithwaite9426165
Treasurer:Colin Freeman027 2369476
Please hand your enrolment form to the treasurer at the desk.

Course A

Volcanology

Course organiser:Margaret Sweet

17 Aug:
Prof. Jim Cole, BSc (Spec, Leics), PhD (Wellington), FRSNZ, is currently a Professor and Research Associate at UC on ‘Tarawera and Its Setting in the Ring of Fire.’This talk will put New Zealand volcanology in a Pacific context, and will include similarities between Maori legends and plate tectonics theory.

24 Aug:
Dr. Paul Ashwell, BSc (Hons), PhD on 'The Eruptions of Tarawera.'Paul will talk about the volcanic history of Tarawera, styles of eruption and what we can learn from experimental research on the rocks from Tarawera., such as that being done in the‘Magma Brewery’ laboratory at the University of Canterbury.

31 Aug:
Philip Andrews, MA (Hons), QSM, President of the Rotorua and District Historical Society on ‘Tarawera, Terraces and Tourist Tales.’This session will look at the impact of the eruption of Mt Tarawera, 10 June 1886, on the surrounding communities. From the 1870s onwards intrepid visitors came from across the world, intent on seeing the famed Pink and White Terraces. The journey to Rotomahana and the wonders to be seen there are described in the words of six separate women tourists.

7 Sep:
Josh Hayes, MSc (Hons), PhD candidate in the Hazard and Disaster Management programme at UC on ‘Effects of Explosive Eruptions, Like Those of Tarawera, on the North Island.’Josh's MSc thesis looked at hypothetical scenarios of cleaning up volcanic ash in Auckland after volcanic eruptions. He will now build on this work in his PhD, which will assess clean-up and restoration of urban areas after volcanic eruptions.

14 Sep:
Bob Rogers M.A. on 'A Maori View of Volcanology.'An outline of the Maori beliefs about Ruuaumoko, the God of Volcanoes, and how these compare with some other cultural beliefs about seismological events and their sources.

Course B

Banks Peninsula

Course organiser:Sally Page

17 Aug:
John O’Dea, Development Manager, Lyttelton Port of Christchurch on 'Developments at the Port of Lyttelton.'John will discuss the extensive damage that occurred at the port following the earthquakes in 2010/11, and cover the port’s road to recovery since that time.

24 Aug:
Jane Robertson, historian and author on 'Head of the Harbour: So Near Yet So Far.....'In this talk, Jane will draw on material from her recently published book, 'Head of the Harbour: A History of Governors Bay, Ōhinetahi, Allandale and Teddington', to explore the challenges of early settlement and the ways in which the development of the area has shaped, and been shaped by, a beautiful but demanding natural environment.

31 Aug:
Peter Tremewan, historian and author on 'The French at Akaroa.'Why did the French government decide to send a warship and a ship of colonists to Akaroa in 1840? What happened when they got there? What did the French settlers do? What did the French Navy do? Why are there Marist rugby clubs all around New Zealand today?

7 Sep:
Suky Thompson, Trust Manager, Rod Donald Banks Peninsula Trust on 'Long Distance Trails - Building Environmental Stewards of the Future.'Suky will give an introduction to the Trust and talk about the work it’s been doing to create a sustainable long distance trail network, its success in getting young people introduced to tramping and the connection with environmental stewardship.

14 Sep:
Di Carter, Ranger, CCC Port Hills Ranger Service on 'Vegetation and Management of the Coastal Cliffs and Rock Outcrops of Banks Peninsula.'Di will also give an update on the areas damaged in the recent Port Hill fires.

Course C

Irish History

Course organiser:Neil Fleming

Presenter:Frieda Looser

The Emerald Isle is a beautiful land that is astonishingly green with very diverse scenery and a population with distinctive cultural traits. Ireland is an ancient land with thousands of years of history and prehistoric landmarks created by some of the earliest inhabitants post the last Ice Age. The Irish contribution to European culture includes stunning Bronze Age gold artefacts, Celtic Christian learning, illuminated manuscripts, and missionaries to the continent. The history of Medieval Ireland was intertwined with that of Britain and Western Europe through Viking and Anglo-Norman occupation and settlement, and since Tudor times there has been a tangle of political and cultural tension, economic exploitation, rebellion, resurgence, and a global diaspora. Ireland is full of surprises and shocking revelations, laughter, humour, bitterness, and ongoing challenges. This series of five lectures will provide an overview of Irish history and aims to inspire further reading, reflection and personal discovery.

21 Sep:
'Earliest inhabitants and the Gaels in Ireland.'

28 Sep:
'Christianity, Norse Vikings, and Anglo-Normans.'

5 Oct:
'Medieval Ireland, Reformation and Reaction.'

12 Oct:
'The Boyne, Protestant Ascendancy, and Union.'

19 Oct:
'Repression, Famine, Republic and Resolutions.'

Course D

Reason and Moral Beliefs

Course organiser:Kathryn Ell

Presenter:Jim Thornton

(This is a slightly revised repeat of a course which has been previously offered.)

“How is morality related to the law? Can anyone know what is right or wrong? Are moral beliefs incurably subjective? Is the only possible objective morality, one which is based on religious beliefs? Is there an ‘absolute’ morality or are all moral beliefs necessarily relative to a particular society or culture? What are moral principles and where do they come from? Is it possible for serious moral disagreements to be resolved through rational discussion? Is it desirable that moral education should be part of the school curriculum?”

These questions are a sample of those which will be discussed. However, to some extent, which particular issues will be dealt with will be determined by audience interest and response. Although it’s intended that subsequent sessions will build on material covered earlier, each week’s talk will more or less constitute a self-contained unity. Technical terms will be kept to a minimum. Given that many of the topics listed above are controversial, questions and critical responses from the audience will be encouraged.

21 Sep:
Session 1

28 Sep:
Session 2

5 Oct:
Session 3

12 Oct:
Session 4

19 Oct:
Session 5