The University of the Third Age

U3A Okeover

Programme for Term 2, 2013

A Facts, Fictions and Foibles

Dates: Thursdays 6, 13, 20, 27 June, 4 July

B Heroines of History

Dates: Thursdays 6, 13, 20, 27 June, 4 July

C OE with an Easel

Dates: Thursdays 11, 18, 25 July, 1, 8 August

D Astronomy

Dates: Thursdays 11, 18, 25 July, 1, 8 August

Times: 10:30 - 11:30

Enrolments for this term closed on Thursday 30 May 2013.

Officers:

Chairman:Peter Moody3517448
Secretary:Peter Braithwaite9426165
Treasurer:Colin Freeman027 2369476
Please hand your enrolment form to the treasurer at the desk.

Course A

Facts, Fictions and Foibles

Course organiser:Garry Jeffery & Bob Ryburn

This course is another of our popular Members’ Miscellanies. It covers a number of very diverse topics presented by members of the committee.

6 Jun:
Kathryn Ell : ‘The Long Shadow of History’. One reader's recent dip into a little fiction, a little historical research and some poems to explore again how writers have captured the collective sacrifice and courage seen across Europe in World War 1.

13 Jun:
Loanne Metcalfe: "Nova Scotia: the past and the people of a 'picture province’." Loanne is a native Nova Scotian who has lived in New Zealand since 1964. She often goes back to visit her family and, in spite of trying, has never lost her accent.

20 Jun:
Two Presentations: • Bob Ryburn presents ‘Small-town Theatres of the Thirties’ - a nostalgic visit to cinema and live theatre in Ashburton at the time of his childhood. • Neil and Faye Fleming talk on ‘Papua New Guinea (1985) and a little Pidgin’. They lived and worked in PNG in 1985 and have some insights into that country, its people and its language(s).

27 Jun:
Garry Jeffery: "Wedded bliss: the adventure of setting up a household in the 1950s & 1960s." Continuing the recall & comparison of the stories we all have from the 'foreign country' that is 50 years ago.

4 Jul:
Rekohu - The Chatham Islands: The Chatham Islands is a name we hear at the end of the weather forecast but a place of which many New Zealanders have little knowledge. This session, jointly presented by David Chapple & Gus Gale, will give an introduction to the geography and history of the Chathams and the unique bird life of this most far-flung of New Zealand's communities.

Course B

Heroines of History

Course organiser:Frank Tay

Presenter:Katie Pickles

What does it take to be a heroine in history? Are heroines super-feminine or honorary men? Do they have power and influence? Are heroines all about image rather than substance? This series of lectures introduces some of the types of women who have become heroines in history. Each lecture focuses on an heroic category and draws upon examples from different times and locations.

6 Jun:
'Spiritual Heroines': Throughout history goddesses and mother figures have emphasized feminine heroic attributes. From the Virgin Mary to modern female saints, this lecture explores the heroism of female spiritual icons.

13 Jun:
'Warrior Heroines': Across time and culture, men are thought of as life-takers and women as life-givers. But there are a few very prominent heroic exceptions. This lecture considers women as warriors and looks at a famous example: Boadiccea.

20 Jun:
'Heroines of Well-being': The life and legend of Florence Nightingale. Here image and reality are often very different.

27 Jun:
'Technological Heroines': In the 20th century a new breed of heroines emerged. These were self-made women in formerly men’s occupations. The talented and hardworking scientist Marie Curie is an example.

4 Jul:
'Radical Heroines': These heroines have self-consciously and actively, or even accidentally, tried to change the world. Rosa Parks, Rigoberta Menchu, Aung San Suu Kyi and Mother Jones are featured.

Course C

OE with an Easel

Course organiser:Pamela Gerrish-Nunn

Presenter:Pamela Gerrish-Nunn

This course looks at the varied experiences and fortunes of New Zealand artists who have worked abroad from the 19th to the 21st centuries, evaluating the effect of overseas experience on their careers. Subjects include expatriates Frances Hodgkins, Len Lye and Alexis Hunter, and returners Margaret Butler, Sydney Thompson and Dorothy Kate Richmond.

11 Jul:
Introduction:

18 Jul:
The Pursuit of Impressionism:

25 Jul:
The Cornish experience:

1 Aug:
In search of Modernity:

8 Aug:
The Politics of Art:

Course D

Astronomy

Course organiser:David Chapple

Our cosmology course in 2011 looked at the origin and nature of the universe and the beliefs held by mankind down through the ages, including the ‘Big Bang’ theory. This course introduces the science of astronomy: the study of celestial objects, their physics, chemistry, and evolution, and phenomena that originate outside the Earth. We learn about our place in the universe, the composition of our solar system and galaxy and how we have found out. We will find answers to such questions as: What keeps us in orbit? How does the sun work? What are stars made of? What is dark matter and dark energy? The night sky will become even more wondrous as we gaze up into the heavens on those cold frosty nights!

11 Jul:
Dr Karen Pollard on 'Our Solar System (Part 1)': An introduction to the nature and types of objects that make up our solar system in general terms. The way in which various space vehicles and space craft have helped explore and understand these solar system objects will be summarised. Karen will also discuss current ideas of how we believe solar systems form.

18 Jul:
Dr Karen Pollard on 'The Universe': Karen will present our current understanding of the nature of the universe with particular reference to normal matter, dark matter and dark energy. She will also highlight interesting astronomical research taking place at the University of Canterbury's Mt John University Observatory, research from around the world and from space-based satellites and its significance for the future.

25 Jul:
Mr Alan Gilmore on 'Our Galaxy, the Milky Way (Part 1)': • The shape and size of our galaxy and our position in it. • Our galactic neighbours – the double stars, clusters, nebulae, supernovae and dark matter. • The night sky, star names, constellations. (A handout accompanies this session)

1 Aug:
Professor John Hearnshaw on 'Our Galaxy, the Milky Way (Part 2) The Lives of the Stars.': Professor Hearnshaw will discuss five questions relating to modern stellar astronomy. • How hot are the stars? • How massive are the stars? • How old are the stars? • How are stars born, and how do they die? • What are stars made of? He answers these questions from the point of view of our present-day knowledge in astronomy, but an historical perspective to these questions will also be introduced showing when and how the answers entered into current astronomical knowledge.

8 Aug:
Professor Jack Baggaley on 'Our Solar System (Part 2)': This session will cover the material of the Solar System that is much smaller than the major planets but also much more abundant: asteroids, comets, meteoroids and dust. Importantly, it is out of this ubiquitous material that the Solar System was created. We will discover how the objects in the Solar System move and what governs their orbits around the Sun. We will devote some final descriptions on methods that are used to measure the sizes and distances from the Sun of the members of the Solar System.